Magellan AO software

Thanks to the hard work of Jared Males and Alfio and Luca the control software is quickly coming together. In this screenshot we can see: (left to right) the Magellan TCS simulation GUI, the Master AO control GUI, the AO Hardware GUI (running 25 hardware subsystems of the AO system –with the CCD47 selected), the CCD39 real-time viewer GUI (showing the PWFS slopes), the VisAO camera control hardware GUI (running 7 hardware subsystems –with CCD47 selected), and finally the VisAO camera real-time display GUI. At this point almost all the functionality needed to close the AO loop has been obtained.The Magellan AO control and engineering GUIs

Stop that Mirror

Our mirror in the test tower with its new pupil stop. This is a delrin cap which was bolted on the “tenet” by Derek and then we added a precision  mask to give a 0.29 central obscuration.

Now the mirror makes a pupil image same as the Magellan Telescope.

The mirror is Flat

Thanks to the hard work of Armando, Marco and Runa the Magellan ASM has had its first round of flattening with the 4D interferometer in the test Tower. It took only one day from start to finish. The shell flattened very well, except in the central area which is hidden from light by the Magellan telescope’s central obscuration, so it does not matter.

The first flat of the Magellan adaptive secondary

Into the Test Tower!

Today we raised our hexapod-mounted adaptive secondary mirror (ASM) into the Arcetri test tower in Florence, Italy.  The large tower will allow us to operate the secondary at the same focal length and optical conjugates as the Magellan telescope in Chile.  We’ll use this test setup to interferometrically test the performance of our ASM and to close the loop on our full AO system.

The Arcetri Test Tower
The Arcetri Test Tower
The concave ellipsoidal ASM with a retroreflector mounted at its short conjugate is raised into the tower.
The concave ellipsoidal ASM with a retroreflector mounted at its short conjugate is raised into the tower.
A grad student magnified by the F/1.1 ASM
A grad student magnified by the F/1.1 ASM
Armando Riccardi trapped inside the looking glass!
Armando Riccardi trapped inside the looking glass!
The Ring anyone?
The Ring anyone?

92% Strehl Sloan r’ Image

The below image is our 92% Strehl Sloan r’ band image with our triplet ADC and dichroic beamsplitter in the beam.  The slight elongation of the PSF and the asymetric contrast of the fringes are due to the “zenith spike” effect of the ADC.  This effect is predicted by our models and will not manifest itself on-sky when the atmosphere will counteract the residual chromatism of the ADC.

Spot diagram showing the broadband chromatic "zenith spike" effect of the ADC in the lab.